playA group of Igbo Nigerians gathered in London - a popular immigrant destination (Nairaland )

 

She claimed she used to work with her sister’s work permit with whom she shares a striking resemblance, but it just goes to highlight the immense risks and ‘life on edge’ lived by these people. The juiciest in all the gist was the way illegal immigrants move through London in buses.

If it is true, I don’t know, but she says, “They basically only take buses driven by other Nigerians. Since they have no documents, they cannot get permits for buses or make payments. So, what they do is leave their homes around 3am to meet buses at stations to continue the sleep they cut short for one-to-two hours.

She continues, “The reason is simple; they want to be on those buses before automated checks for passengers start with the central controlling system a little later. The crazy aspect though is during impromptu police checks. The drivers, being Nigerian help these passengers if they spot the police early enough. They always give them a head start to prepare to run — when necessary.”

Why relocate?

Foreign countries simply possess far greater prospects to anything Nigeria can offer most people, barring the affluent or the politicians.

Even some affluent people still loathe the idea of living in Nigeria. For the lucky immigrants who don’t get deported, the job opportunities and the prospect of great paydays are simply better than being faced with unemployment in Nigeria — especially for one without expertise in any craft or trade.

The desperation to live abroad is a worry, however. Recently, the BBC reported how over 50 Nigerian immigrant girls were victims of serial abuse, violent crimes, terrible working conditions and other factors that mirror modern slavery in Saudi Arabia — they also reported that the actual number runs into the thousands.

playPeople from sub-Saharan African countries overloading a boat meant for European destination (Naija News)

 

Equally, we hear of Nigerians who perish in the Sahara desert or the Atlantic Ocean while attempting to illegally cross to European countries like Spain through Libya and Morocco on overfilled boats or via the desert. We cannot really blame them, terrible conditions in their countries made extreme choices palatable.

According to the PEW Global research;

playIn Messina, Italy, Migrants rescued off a boat off the coast of Libya (Sipa)

 

The problem is very much alive, but it is not one to be solved by criticism or appraisal, but with affirmative, pragmatic action.

(Read more at Pulse.ng)

" /> playA group of Igbo Nigerians gathered in London - a popular immigrant destination (Nairaland )

 

She claimed she used to work with her sister’s work permit with whom she shares a striking resemblance, but it just goes to highlight the immense risks and ‘life on edge’ lived by these people. The juiciest in all the gist was the way illegal immigrants move through London in buses.

If it is true, I don’t know, but she says, “They basically only take buses driven by other Nigerians. Since they have no documents, they cannot get permits for buses or make payments. So, what they do is leave their homes around 3am to meet buses at stations to continue the sleep they cut short for one-to-two hours.

She continues, “The reason is simple; they want to be on those buses before automated checks for passengers start with the central controlling system a little later. The crazy aspect though is during impromptu police checks. The drivers, being Nigerian help these passengers if they spot the police early enough. They always give them a head start to prepare to run — when necessary.”

Why relocate?

Foreign countries simply possess far greater prospects to anything Nigeria can offer most people, barring the affluent or the politicians.

Even some affluent people still loathe the idea of living in Nigeria. For the lucky immigrants who don’t get deported, the job opportunities and the prospect of great paydays are simply better than being faced with unemployment in Nigeria — especially for one without expertise in any craft or trade.

The desperation to live abroad is a worry, however. Recently, the BBC reported how over 50 Nigerian immigrant girls were victims of serial abuse, violent crimes, terrible working conditions and other factors that mirror modern slavery in Saudi Arabia — they also reported that the actual number runs into the thousands.

playPeople from sub-Saharan African countries overloading a boat meant for European destination (Naija News)

 

Equally, we hear of Nigerians who perish in the Sahara desert or the Atlantic Ocean while attempting to illegally cross to European countries like Spain through Libya and Morocco on overfilled boats or via the desert. We cannot really blame them, terrible conditions in their countries made extreme choices palatable.

According to the PEW Global research;

playIn Messina, Italy, Migrants rescued off a boat off the coast of Libya (Sipa)

 

The problem is very much alive, but it is not one to be solved by criticism or appraisal, but with affirmative, pragmatic action.

(Read more at Pulse.ng)

" /> playA group of Igbo Nigerians gathered in London - a popular immigrant destination (Nairaland )

 

She claimed she used to work with her sister’s work permit with whom she shares a striking resemblance, but it just goes to highlight the immense risks and ‘life on edge’ lived by these people. The juiciest in all the gist was the way illegal immigrants move through London in buses.

If it is true, I don’t know, but she says, “They basically only take buses driven by other Nigerians. Since they have no documents, they cannot get permits for buses or make payments. So, what they do is leave their homes around 3am to meet buses at stations to continue the sleep they cut short for one-to-two hours.

She continues, “The reason is simple; they want to be on those buses before automated checks for passengers start with the central controlling system a little later. The crazy aspect though is during impromptu police checks. The drivers, being Nigerian help these passengers if they spot the police early enough. They always give them a head start to prepare to run — when necessary.”

Why relocate?

Foreign countries simply possess far greater prospects to anything Nigeria can offer most people, barring the affluent or the politicians.

Even some affluent people still loathe the idea of living in Nigeria. For the lucky immigrants who don’t get deported, the job opportunities and the prospect of great paydays are simply better than being faced with unemployment in Nigeria — especially for one without expertise in any craft or trade.

The desperation to live abroad is a worry, however. Recently, the BBC reported how over 50 Nigerian immigrant girls were victims of serial abuse, violent crimes, terrible working conditions and other factors that mirror modern slavery in Saudi Arabia — they also reported that the actual number runs into the thousands.

playPeople from sub-Saharan African countries overloading a boat meant for European destination (Naija News)

 

Equally, we hear of Nigerians who perish in the Sahara desert or the Atlantic Ocean while attempting to illegally cross to European countries like Spain through Libya and Morocco on overfilled boats or via the desert. We cannot really blame them, terrible conditions in their countries made extreme choices palatable.

According to the PEW Global research;

playIn Messina, Italy, Migrants rescued off a boat off the coast of Libya (Sipa)

 

The problem is very much alive, but it is not one to be solved by criticism or appraisal, but with affirmative, pragmatic action.

(Read more at Pulse.ng)

" />

The projects are critical, your review is required.




Public Review: WHY RELOCATE

Public Review: WHY RELOCATE

Sponsored by Bailout Nigeria , November 15, 2018

Category: Living Expenses
Target Amount: NGN0.00

The story

Reality of life abroad

In 2016, I had a conversation with a certain Tawa (not real name), 38 - then 36, and a mother of one, somewhere around Schoolgate, Ibeju Lekki for over 70 minutes. She had just returned - mostly for her son - from a 36-month sojourn  in London having saved enough while working as a nanny, and then, a babysitter.

playA group of Igbo Nigerians gathered in London - a popular immigrant destination (Nairaland )

 

She claimed she used to work with her sister’s work permit with whom she shares a striking resemblance, but it just goes to highlight the immense risks and ‘life on edge’ lived by these people. The juiciest in all the gist was the way illegal immigrants move through London in buses.

If it is true, I don’t know, but she says, “They basically only take buses driven by other Nigerians. Since they have no documents, they cannot get permits for buses or make payments. So, what they do is leave their homes around 3am to meet buses at stations to continue the sleep they cut short for one-to-two hours.

She continues, “The reason is simple; they want to be on those buses before automated checks for passengers start with the central controlling system a little later. The crazy aspect though is during impromptu police checks. The drivers, being Nigerian help these passengers if they spot the police early enough. They always give them a head start to prepare to run — when necessary.”

Why relocate?

Foreign countries simply possess far greater prospects to anything Nigeria can offer most people, barring the affluent or the politicians.

Even some affluent people still loathe the idea of living in Nigeria. For the lucky immigrants who don’t get deported, the job opportunities and the prospect of great paydays are simply better than being faced with unemployment in Nigeria — especially for one without expertise in any craft or trade.

The desperation to live abroad is a worry, however. Recently, the BBC reported how over 50 Nigerian immigrant girls were victims of serial abuse, violent crimes, terrible working conditions and other factors that mirror modern slavery in Saudi Arabia — they also reported that the actual number runs into the thousands.

playPeople from sub-Saharan African countries overloading a boat meant for European destination (Naija News)

 

Equally, we hear of Nigerians who perish in the Sahara desert or the Atlantic Ocean while attempting to illegally cross to European countries like Spain through Libya and Morocco on overfilled boats or via the desert. We cannot really blame them, terrible conditions in their countries made extreme choices palatable.

According to the PEW Global research;

playIn Messina, Italy, Migrants rescued off a boat off the coast of Libya (Sipa)

 

  • The rate of migrants from sub-Saharan Africa to Europe was pegged at about 970,000 people between 2010 and 2017.

  • About 400,000 people fleeing conflict from sub-Saharan Africa moved to the United States of America between 2010 and 2016. From that number, the US Department of Homeland Securities and US State Department records that 110, 000 people were resettled as refugees, another 190,000 were became lawful permanent residents by virtue of family ties and nearly 110,000 more benefited from the US diversity visa program.

  • The United Nations reports that about 420,000 sub-Saharan African migrants lived in Europe in 2017 (4.15 million) than in 2010 (3.73 million), and that another estimated 1.55 million sub-Saharan African migrants lived in the U.S in 2017, an increase of about a 325,000 from 2010, when an estimated 1.22 million sub-Saharan African migrants lived in the country.

  • The United Nations reports that more 51% of sub-Saharan African migrants living in the U.S. as of 2017 were born in just four countries: Nigeria, Ethiopia, Ghana and Kenya.

  • In terms of destinations, as of 2017, nearly three-quarters (72%) of Europe’s sub-Saharan immigrant population was concentrated in just four countries: the UK (1.27 million), France (980,000), Italy (370,000) and Portugal (360,000).

  • In the U.S., migrants from sub-Saharan Africa can be found across the country, with 42% in the American South, 24% in the Northeast, 18% in the Midwest and 17% in the West.

The problem is very much alive, but it is not one to be solved by criticism or appraisal, but with affirmative, pragmatic action.

(Read more at Pulse.ng)


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